Quelle différence entre un test d’arborescence et un tri par cartes inversé ?

Lors d’un atelier que je menais sur le test d’arborescence, un des participants m’a demandé quelle était la différence entre le test d’arborescence et le tri par cartes inversé. Continue reading Quelle différence entre un test d’arborescence et un tri par cartes inversé ?

Heuristic evaluation of Mini Ninjas and how to describe problems

This article goes through an old heuristic evaluation using Katherine Isbister and Noah Schaffer’s criteria found in the Game Usability book. You’ll find an example of presentation slides, followed by an in-depth review of common mistakes to avoid when writing expert reviews. Continue reading Heuristic evaluation of Mini Ninjas and how to describe problems

Cats 2048 – usability evaluation

As part of a benchmark series, we will look at many 2048 games out there to see how they compare, and highlight best practices swell as common pitfalls for this type of games.

Next up, Cats 2048.

Continue reading Cats 2048 – usability evaluation

Colorful 2048 – another usability evaluation

As part of a benchmark series, we will look at many 2048 games out there to see how they compare, and highlight best practices swell as common pitfalls for this type of games.

Next up, another colorful 2048.

Continue reading Colorful 2048 – another usability evaluation

2048 – tile merge feedback comparison across games

This article takes a look at how different 2048 games provide feedback when a player successfully merges tiles and how those feedback choices affect player perception of their success and progress. Continue reading 2048 – tile merge feedback comparison across games

Full indie 2016 : Design constrains in narrative exploration games

Nels Anderson shared some of the things he has learnt making Firewatch during 2016th Full Indie summit. Being more of a systems designer, he has learnt a lot working on a narrative exploration.

Unlike puzzle games like the Talos Principle or The witness, narrative exploration games (sadly known as walking simulators) don’t rely on puzzles to keep the player going. Unlike Life is Strange or Tales of Borderlands, the player is the one deciding where he’s taking the adventure.

As a result, Nels had to learn to face five challenges which he shared with us : being shackled by the premises, working in present tense, communicating information to the player, making the game work when narrative is all there is, and playtesting this kind of game.

Continue reading Full indie 2016 : Design constrains in narrative exploration games

Full Indie 2016 : Let’s get physical – lessons from the real world

Zach Gage shared with us some things he has learnt from making physical games to re-use in video games. I’ve collected some of the rich thoughts from his talk on card, dice and billiard.

I found his comments on handling randomness and adapting incentives to player skill particularly interesting. On top of gameplay ideas, I like the idea of making board games to experiment with video game mechanics as a cost-effective way to learn from a concept before writing a single line of code.

Continue reading Full Indie 2016 : Let’s get physical – lessons from the real world

Full indie 2016 : Leading VR beyond the zombie shooter

According to Kayla Kinnunen, today is the beginning of a 10 years journey to Virtual Reality consumption and creation for everyone. We’re still way at the 1% adoption rate, before the big scary schasm that separates failed innovations that never sold beyond early adopters to the mass market. And Kayla believes the Zombie shooter isn’t what will get VR past the Schasm.

Here’s what I gathered from her inspiring talk.

Continue reading Full indie 2016 : Leading VR beyond the zombie shooter