A game usability review of Auralux

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Auralux is a smart kind of strategy game in which the player controls planets. Planets generate particles which revolve around the planet. They can be used to conquer new empty planets or invade planets controlled by an AI. The goal of the game is to control all the planets and get rid of all AIs.

Tested on Android / Samsung Galaxy S3

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6 month of social network activity on game accessibility

A study based on the analysis of 856 mentions online – excluding facebook and linkedin

The hype started begin of august and the rush lasted half a month. Accessibility became a huge topic until begin of October, and fell back to regular levels of mentions. Begin January show a new increase in mensions. Articles on the topic were massively shared on twitter and on websites mainly in the USA but also in UK (not so much on blogs and forums). Canada and France don’t seem to have noticed anything really – or remained quieter about it on those networks at least.

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A game usability review of Amazing Brick

Amazing Brick is a very simple mobile game about making a cube pass stages by tapping the screen on the left or right side to make the cube jump up in one direction or the other and get as far as they can. And here’s its short usability review.

Tested on Android / Samsung Galaxy S3

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Axure Basics: Creating menus with dynamic panels

Creating dynamic panels with axure

Dynamic panels are a powerful tool of Axure. They allow users to add interactive areas to their wireframes or mockups. Creating them is easy too.

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Where there is a will, there is a way : playtesting during the pre-production phase

A while ago, I was talking with one of the students in game user research from ENJMIN. He was eagerly waiting to have the first game prototype to start testing and had a lot of ideas. He was at a loss however as to what to do meanwhile.

In my experience, not having a game prototype is a non issue : that’s when everything can still be changed, it’s the perfect time for testing! Many solutions exist to be able to test concepts and gameplay mecanics even without a prototype. With little help from the developers, game designers it is possible to design a test and anticipate some or most of the major usability issues before having a game to playtest. This article proposes an overview of solutions to still be able to conduct tests early in the development process.

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Don’t Playtest Your Game

Où Steve nous rappelle que finalement, tester son jeu sur un salon rempli de fanboy, animé par le papa du projet, c’est comme montrer une photo de son bébé. Pas question de dire au fier papa que son bidochon tout frippé, il est moche et aurait bien besoin d’une couche fraiche.

By Steve

This post is about why you shouldn’t playtest your game. But it’s not about why your game shouldn’t be tested. It just shouldn’t be you, the developer, doing it.

Playtesting during development is invaluable, and it’s great to see how enthusiastic many teams are about running their own tests. However there are a number of biases and pitfalls that we often see in tests run by the developers for their own game, which alter the feedback received and greatly reduce its value.

In this post I cover some of these biases and look at ways in which they can be minimised, to Lire l’article…

Source: Game User Research

Axure basics : creating within-page interactions part 2 : dynamic panels

We have discussed earlier the general layout and logic of axure, how to create browsable storyboards with the tool, and how to implement simple within-page interactions such as anchor links.

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UsabilityHub tests review

Many platforms allow cheap and easy access to remote usability testing. Solutions like optimal workshop, usability hub, usertesting.com allow anyone to quickly set up a test and propose services from proposing user panels and recruiting participants to fully designing tests and providing consolidated reports.

Aside from the biaises introduced by remote usability testing, one concern lies in the possibility for anyone to access the tools for conducting research regardless of their prior training and experience. To verify the quality of tests created on those platforms, regardless the authors, we have passed and analysed biases of 160 random tests on usabilityHUB.

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Insights on interaction patterns using mobile devices

After having a look at how users hold their mobile devices, how they interact with their mobile devices, which hand they use to interact with their smartphones, and what their attention span might be…. let’s have a look at how this all plays out through time.

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